about cataracts

About Cataracts

about glaucoma

About Glaucoma

about the retina

About The Retina

about the cornea

About The Cornea

about oculoplastics

About Oculoplastics

Myopia: Overview

Myopia Overview

Hyperopia: Overview

Hyperopia Overview

Astigmatism: Overview

Astigmatism Overview

Presbyopia: Overview

Presbyopia Overview
Request an AppointmentOffice Photo TourContact Our Office

All about YOUR EYES

How the eye sees…

The eye’s surface is convex. Light rays first pass through the clear cornea on the surface, then through the lens located inside of the eye, where they bend toward its center. In an eye that has a normally curved cornea and the correct shape, an image focuses exactly on the retina to produce normal “perfect” vision, also called “emmetropia.”

…and sometimes DOESN’T see

Nearsightedness (myopia)

When the eyeball is too long, light rays focus in front of, rather than on the retina. Under these circumstances, near objects are perceived clearly, but distant objects are not.

Farsightedness (hyperopia)

When the eyeball is too short, light rays entering the eye focus behind the retina. Distant objects are seen clearly, but near objects are not.

Astigmatism

Vision becomes distorted when the surface of the cornea has an uneven curvature. Sometimes it is the eye’s lens that is irregularly shaped. This type of irregularity causes light to focus on more than one spot of the eye, resulting in blurred vision.

Presbyopia (loss of reading vision)

Over time, the eye’s lens gradually loses its elasticity and its ability to change shape (“accommodate”) to see close objects. Bifocals or reading glasses are the traditional prescription for remedying this presbyopic loss of accommodation, but newer technology makes it possible to exchange the inflexible lens for one designed to compensate for changes in the eye and improve functional vision at all distances.

Do you have both presbyopia AND cataracts? Read about premium lifestyle lens implants that may correct both at the same time.

The eye can develop other vision-threatening conditions, too. Read about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diseases of the cornea.

See Frequently Asked Questions about:

Cataracts

Glaucoma

The Retina

The Cornea

Oculoplastic Surgery

All about YOUR EYES

How the eye sees…

The eye’s surface is convex. Light rays first pass through the clear cornea on the surface, then through the lens located inside of the eye, where they bend toward its center. In an eye that has a normally curved cornea and the correct shape, an image focuses exactly on the retina to produce normal “perfect” vision, also called “emmetropia.”

…and sometimes DOESN’T see

Nearsightedness (myopia)

When the eyeball is too long, light rays focus in front of, rather than on, the retina. Under these circumstances, near objects are perceived clearly, but distant objects are not.

Farsightedness (hyperopia)

When the eyeball is too short, light rays entering the eye focus behind the retina. Distant objects are seen clearly, but near objects are not.

Astigmatism

Vision becomes distorted when the surface of the cornea has an uneven curvature. Sometimes it is the eye’s lens that is irregularly shaped. This type of irregularity causes light to focus on more than one spot of the eye, resulting in blurred vision.

Presbyopia (loss of reading vision)

Over time, the eye’s lens gradually loses its elasticity and its ability to change shape (“accommodate”) to see close objects. Bifocals or reading glasses are the traditional prescription for remedying this presbyopic loss of accommodation, but newer technology makes it possible to exchange the inflexible lens for one designed to compensate for changes in the eye and improve functional vision at all distances.

Do you have both presbyopia AND cataracts? Read about premium lifestyle lens implants that may correct both at the same time.

The eye can develop other vision-threatening conditions, too. Read about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diseases of the cornea.

See Frequently Asked Questions about:

Cataracts

Glaucoma

The Retina

The Cornea

Oculoplastic Surgery

Myopia: Overview

Myopia Overview

Hyperopia: Overview

Hyperopia Overview

Astigmatism: Overview

Astigmatism Overview

Presbyopia: Overview

Presbyopia Overview
about cataractsabout glaucomaabout the retinaabout the corneaabout oculoplastics Request an Appointment

 

about cataracts

About Cataracts

about glaucoma

About Glaucoma

about the retina

About The Retina

about the cornea

About The Cornea

about oculoplastics

About Oculoplastics

Myopia: Overview

Myopia Overview

Hyperopia: Overview

Hyperopia Overview

Astigmatism: Overview

Astigmatism Overview

Presbyopia: Overview

Presbyopia Overview
Request an AppointmentOffice Photo TourContact Our Office

All about YOUR EYES

How the eye sees…

The eye’s surface is convex. Light rays first pass through the clear cornea on the surface, then through the lens located inside of the eye, where they bend toward its center. In an eye that has a normally curved cornea and the correct shape, an image focuses exactly on the retina to produce normal “perfect” vision, also called “emmetropia.”

…and sometimes DOESN’T see

Nearsightedness (myopia)

When the eyeball is too long, light rays focus in front of, rather than on the retina. Under these circumstances, near objects are perceived clearly, but distant objects are not.

Farsightedness (hyperopia)

When the eyeball is too short, light rays entering the eye focus behind the retina. Distant objects are seen clearly, but near objects are not.

Astigmatism

Vision becomes distorted when the surface of the cornea has an uneven curvature. Sometimes it is the eye’s lens that is irregularly shaped. This type of irregularity causes light to focus on more than one spot of the eye, resulting in blurred vision.

Presbyopia (loss of reading vision)

Over time, the eye’s lens gradually loses its elasticity and its ability to change shape (“accommodate”) to see close objects. Bifocals or reading glasses are the traditional prescription for remedying this presbyopic loss of accommodation, but newer technology makes it possible to exchange the inflexible lens for one designed to compensate for changes in the eye and improve functional vision at all distances.

Do you have both presbyopia AND cataracts? Read about premium lifestyle lens implants that may correct both at the same time.

The eye can develop other vision-threatening conditions, too. Read about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diseases of the cornea.

See Frequently Asked Questions about:

Cataracts

Glaucoma

The Retina

The Cornea

Oculoplastic Surgery

All about YOUR EYES

How the eye sees…

The eye’s surface is convex. Light rays first pass through the clear cornea on the surface, then through the lens located inside of the eye, where they bend toward its center. In an eye that has a normally curved cornea and the correct shape, an image focuses exactly on the retina to produce normal “perfect” vision, also called “emmetropia.”

…and sometimes DOESN’T see

Nearsightedness (myopia)

When the eyeball is too long, light rays focus in front of, rather than on, the retina. Under these circumstances, near objects are perceived clearly, but distant objects are not.

Farsightedness (hyperopia)

When the eyeball is too short, light rays entering the eye focus behind the retina. Distant objects are seen clearly, but near objects are not.

Astigmatism

Vision becomes distorted when the surface of the cornea has an uneven curvature. Sometimes it is the eye’s lens that is irregularly shaped. This type of irregularity causes light to focus on more than one spot of the eye, resulting in blurred vision.

Presbyopia (loss of reading vision)

Over time, the eye’s lens gradually loses its elasticity and its ability to change shape (“accommodate”) to see close objects. Bifocals or reading glasses are the traditional prescription for remedying this presbyopic loss of accommodation, but newer technology makes it possible to exchange the inflexible lens for one designed to compensate for changes in the eye and improve functional vision at all distances.

Do you have both presbyopia AND cataracts? Read about premium lifestyle lens implants that may correct both at the same time.

The eye can develop other vision-threatening conditions, too. Read about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diseases of the cornea.

See Frequently Asked Questions about:

Cataracts

Glaucoma

The Retina

The Cornea

Oculoplastic Surgery

Myopia: Overview

Myopia Overview

Hyperopia: Overview

Hyperopia Overview

Astigmatism: Overview

Astigmatism Overview

Presbyopia: Overview

Presbyopia Overview
about cataractsabout glaucomaabout the retinaabout the corneaabout oculoplastics Request an Appointment